Salt Therapy

Salt Therapy

Halotherapy, originated more than 150 years ago, in natural salt caves and mines. In fact, this type of salt therapy can be traced back to the Grecian age, when Hippocrates recommended salt inhalation as an effective treatment for respiratory issues!

European monks also discovered a similar pattern, noticing that patients treated in salt caverns healed faster than those treated elsewhere. Its Polish roots began in 1843, when Polish physician Felix Boczkowski studied the men working in salt mines at Wielickza.

Boczkowski learned that these salt mine workers had fewer respiratory problems than others, tracing the phenomenon back to the inhalation of salt dust. Because of this, a halotherapy therapeutic spa was developed in Poland.

In Germany during World War II, salt mines were a common area for bomb shelters, leading to disturbances in the mine that let salt dust out into the air. People taking cover in these mines found that their respiratory problems were greatly lessened as a result.

In the 1950s, salt therapy took a new turn. Eastern European physicians figured out how to simulate the natural conditions of salt caves, with help from engineers. This lead to modern-day salt therapy, as we know it now, with countless halotherapy treatment areas opening up across Europe and Scandanavia in the 1980s and 1990s.
Many salt therapy rooms are in operation in European hospitals, letting patients access the great benefits of salt therapy in a healthcare setting.

Salt therapy is growing in popularity within North America, and people are discovering what an excellent treatment it can be for respiratory issues.